You home heating bill is getting more expensive and cutting it isn’t as hard as you thought. Here is how to do so.

1) Install A Programmable Thermostat:

If your thermostat isn’t currently a programmable model or unit, see if you can afford one. This upgrade will save you money in the long run. Energy Star estimates that a home of typical size can save up to $200 in the first year alone if it removes the manual thermostat for one that can be programmed.

Many models are available, and your weekly schedule is honestly what should determine the one you get. A 7-day model might give you the most flexibility, but there are also 5+2 models to split weekdays and weekend controls. You can even find 5/1/1 units for weekday, Saturday, and Sunday settings.

Every degree you raise your thermostat raises your energy use by 5 percent or more, so keep things cozy but a little cool. That’s 68 degrees Fahrenheit for most folks. If you’re stuck with a manual thermostat, just remember to turn your heat down when you leave home or when you go to bed to reduce your heating bill substantially.

2) Keep Your Furnace Well-Maintained:

You need to change your furnace filter monthly, and even one designed for quarterly changing needs to be swapped out more often than that if it looks at all dirty. Dirty filters mean more work for your furnace because the air flow is slower than it should be.

If you want optimal performance from your furnace, get it checked out and professionally cleaned once a year. Older furnaces in particular need this, as they might not be as efficient as they once were. If that’s the case, add a bio ethanol fireplace. A furnace professional can assess the efficiency of your furnace with such precision, that he can tell you whether it’s time to get a new one or not.

3) Cover Up Your Bare Floors:

Do you ever crank your heat just because your feet are cold? If you like walking around your home in bare feet in all seasons, then rugs make great floor coverings in any areas you trot through more than others. Heavy socks and comfy slippers also make good choices if you don’t have to be bare-footed but don’t want to wear shoes in your home. Look for slipper-socks that have traction soles that prevent you from sliding on a bare floor.

4) Cut Out Drafts:

Use a window insulation kit or even rope caulk to insulate any drafty windows you have. You’ll likely notice an immediate difference, and you’ll also keep your furnace from working overtime to make up for cold air seeping in. Also eliminate drafts your doors might have by using door sweeps, caulk, and weather stripping.

5) Clear Your Heating Vents:

Move your furniture away from heating vents so you know there’s enough space for the room to be actually heated, instead of just the pieces of furniture in the way. Air deflectors placed over vents can also direct heat in an outward direction rather than just letting it drift higher towards drapes or curtains. Also, prevent dust buildup by regularly vacuuming vents and registers.

6) Make Blinds And Curtains Your Friend:

Make a habit of opening blinds and curtains early in your day so the sun’s rays can help warm the house. Close them after dusk to add insulation. If you’re planning on sleeping in on the weekend, open your shades or blinds partly before you crash; that lets in some sunlight while still giving you privacy.

7) Use Heat You Already Have:

If it’s cold outside, generate more heat in your home by using your oven. Whip up tasty casseroles for meals, or just bake sweet desserts for those you love. Do both! Once you’re done using your oven, leave its door open so the heat can escape into your home. You can also do this with your dryer when doing laundry. Having said this, keep safety in mind if there are kids or animals in the home, as leaving a door open to a hot oven, even just a crack, isn’t a good idea.

Author: Alexa Paul

Buzz and Lola provide information about home improvement including Bathroom, Kitchen, Bedroom, Living Room also share tips on Fashion, Jewelry and Craft design.